There’s more to taste

At Liberté, taste is infinite, and our obsession, endless.

There’s more to taste

At Liberté, taste is infinite, and our obsession, endless.

There’s more to taste

At Liberté, taste is infinite, and our obsession, endless.

Cream Cheese

Cream Cheese

This is the product that launched Liberté in 1937, and we haven’t changed a thing since. It’s standard issue at most Montreal bagel shops – nothing else will do. It’s tangier and brinier than most cream cheeses, and has the rich, ripe flavour of cultured butter. Its texture is fluffy, velvety, and very spreadable. It melts instantly in your mouth. Perfect in canapés and sandwiches, as well as on crackers, and raisin toast. Find more useful tips, and tell us what you think of our Cream Cheese.

The Aurora Borealis

The Aurora Borealis

This Nordic variation of the classic bagel and cream cheese features the hearty crunch of rye crisps, the earthy aroma of beets, and the silky textures of plum and salmon, all wrapped in the lush softness of our new Liberté Greek Double Cream.

The Harvest Moon
The Midnight Sun
The Arctic Circle
 The lucky monkey
The pie in the sky

The pie in the sky

This taste experience is inspired by the classic combination of apple pie and cheddar cheese, deconstructed and accented with salt and caramel, a surprising hint of smoke, and the indulgence of our plain Méditerranée yogourt.

Bitter

Tasting notes Bitter

Bitter

Tasting notes

Bitter

In the plant kingdom, bitterness often signals poison. It’s why babies will automatically spit out anything bitter – it’s a deep-rooted instinctive reaction. Yet many of us acquire quite a taste for bitter things: beer, coffee, citrus peel, and mildly bitter greens like rapini and endive. For centuries, bitter herbs have been infused in alcohol and taken as a restorative, or to improve digestion. These “bitters” are making a huge comeback on the craft cocktail scene, and bitter as a flavour is enjoying a moment in the spotlight – Canadian author Jennifer McLagan’s recent book Bitter is a fascinating and delicious read on the topic. She considers bitter to be ‘the most sophisticated flavour’.